Rajesh R Nambiar
Sr. Program Manager
EMC Academic Alliance Program

An approach to computing that uses a shared resource to deliver computing that is consumed as a service. Many different service models and delivery types exist, but all cloud computing types are capable of ondemand, elastic, self-service delivery of resources via broad network access and can be provided as a measured or metered service from a shared pool of resources.

Private cloud

This is a cloud computing environment that a private organization creates for its own private use. Resources that an organization owns or directly controls are consolidated and pooled by federating resources which then provide cloud compute resources and services back to the organization as a service.

A cloud computing environment created by pooling resources from a specific group of members (the community) and in turn providing those resources back to that same specific group of members as a service.

Public cloud

Cloud computing provided as a service to the public from a provider's shared resource. Similar to an outsourcer, but must be consistent with the cloud characteristics of on-demand, elastic, self-service resources, accessible over a network, and provided as a measured or metered service from a shared pool of resources. Depending on what the provider makes available to each customer, the services may or may not be secure, and the resources may or may not be capable of federating with other (i.e., private) resources.

Community cloud

A cloud computing environment created by pooling resources from a specific group of members (the community) and in turn providing those resources back to that same specific group of members as a service

Hybrid cloud

Cloud computing environment created by federating and pooling resources together from an organization's private cloud with the resources from a third-party provider. Because the resources are federated and pooled before being provided as a compute service to the organization, the hybrid cloud will appear just like a private cloud to users, application owners, and the line of business.

Virtual private cloud

A non-standard term, that certain vendors rather than standards bodies such as the NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) use. It refers to a hybrid cloud that appears to users, application owners, and the line of business as a private cloud. Federation is the key concept necessary to join and pool resources to be redistributed to users, application owners, and the line of business so that the resource still appears as a private cloud.

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Cloud infrastructure

MThe infrastructure used to deliver cloud services (usually transparently) to users. It includes capabilities to virtualize and federate resources and standardize and automate operational tasks, allows users to access and control the quantity and quality of compute service needed, and includes a way to measure and account for services delivered.

Cloud services

1.Infrastructure services delivered in a cloud computing environment to support service-level requirements (e.g., performance, availability, retention, security and capacity).

2.Services that enable a cloud computing environment (e.g., billing software that enables cloud compute environments of different size and service levels to be charged based on the service provided).

3.Professional services that aid organizations in their transformation and journey relating to cloud computing.

4.Application services delivered in a cloud computing environment that provides standardized application functionality to application developers (i.e., authentication routines, search routines, policy fields and ITIL routines).

Cloud storage

Storage capacity and/or storage services (performance, availability, retention and find-ability, security, etc.) that are provided as a service that meet the characteristics of cloud computing (on-demand, pooled, network accessed, elastic, and measured service). May or may not provide the ability to federate with existing storage resources.

Multi-tenancy

A compute environment that is shared by multiple groups or users yet provides isolation and separation between users (the tenants) so that users have no awareness of and access to other tenants or their information and resources.

Tenants in control

This is the ability for each user in a multi-tenant environment to directly control the compute characteristics and service levels of their own environments (sometimes within a predefined range) without the involvement of centralized IT administrators. This direct control does not equate to unlimited control; for example, economic incentives and controls such as approval steps and minimum or maximum service-level settings may limit what is available for a user to directly control.

Federation

The joining of separate, multiple resources in such a way that they act, or can be acted upon, as a single, larger resource. The single, larger resource is used to create and distribute quantities and qualities of resources needed by users, or tenants, as a service.

Software–as–a–service

A software application used by accessing the software and the software's predefined compute environment over a network, rather than by downloading and installing the software on a local compute environment or computer. Each user is a tenant in the provider's multi-tenant shared environment. However, the user usually does not have much control over the services and service levels provided.

Platform–as–a–service

A third-party provider's shared compute environment that is remotely accessed by a user to develop and run a software application (or to modify a software-asa-service offering). Each user is a tenant in the provider's multi-tenant shared environment. By definition, users create any functionality and application service they'd like; however, it is unusual for the compute environment itself to offer much control over the infrastructure service levels.

Infrastructure–as–a–service

A complete IT infrastructure that is consumed as a service by users, application owners, lines of business, etc. Each user, or tenant, accesses a portion of a consolidated pool of federated resources to create his or her own compute infrastructure as needed, when needed, and how needed. The consolidated pool is designed to provide a shared, multi-tenant compute environment so that each tenant may prescribe to the type and nature of infrastructure service they need. The shared, multi-tenant environment may be entirely owned and controlled by that organization (as in private cloud), or it may be created by joining and federating both company-owned resources and complemented by third-party resources (as in hybrid cloud), or it may be entirely provided by a third party (as in public cloud).

On-demand self-service

A computing environment, that is accessed and used as needed by users, rather than controlled and provided by centralized infrastructure administrators. Ondemand self-service does not equate to unlimited control. Economic incentives and controls such as approval steps and minimum or maximum service-level settings, for example, may limit what is available to a user as an ondemand self-service resource.

Broad network access

This is a compute environment that is accessed over a network like the Internet or an Extranet.

Resource pooling

The joining of multiple resources together so that they can be shared and redistributed in the quantity and quality needed.

Rapid elasticity

The ability to create, grow, add, shrink, or eliminate the use of resources quickly and easily. Needed resources come from the shared pool of resources, and when no longer needed they are returned to that resource pool.

Measured service

The accounting, or tracking, of the quantity and quality of compute resources and services consumed. Quantity of resources may include server compute power, network bandwidth, storage capacity, etc. Quality of services may include degrees or levels of performance, availability, protection, retention, speed of find-ability, and security.